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I miss my long hair. :|

University of California, Berkeley

You gave me the best and worst 3 years of my life. I know that when I’m frustrated, I say that I’m willing to trade all of it in for a perfect GPA at another school but that’s my frustration talking. Truth be told,  I wouldn’t trade any of it because I am who am I am now because of you.

chickdeney:

chronic-faerie:

gimmeallyoresidualz:

glamorousmonstrosity:

fangirlfeminists:

veganmoonprincess:

This is disgusting did they just smack the walden instagram filter on her

This isn’t the Walden instagram filter otherwise the shirt color would have changed, they lightened her skin by a fucking lot.

gimmeallyoresidualz
omg do you see this shit??? Ugh this makes me so mad

In a nutshell why I still to this day get insecure about my skin color. This pisses me off to no end

Wow they didn’t even try to be subtle wtf

Unbelievable

(Source: mmatangi, via i-dobitemythumb)

wendieee:

So yesterday, we had a new MCAT instructor and he totally looked like Sheldon Cooper. He started out lecture like this:
MCATguy: So, just curious how many of you guys are taking the MCAT on January?Everyone raises hand. MCATguy: Alright. How many of you guys are in relationships?  Half the room raises hand. MCATguy: Okay, lemme tell you a story that happened to me that’s going to happen to you.  Goes to board and draws circles.  MCATguy: Okay, here’s YOU. And here’s your boyfriend or girlfriend. Or even friends for that matter.Draws another circle MCATguy: Okay, and here is the MCAT.  Now, think of it this way…the MCAT, is a really good nucleophile. Whole class laughs while he draws bond breaking arrows MCATguy: True story.

ha ha haaaaaaaaa! 

wendieee:

So yesterday, we had a new MCAT instructor and he totally looked like Sheldon Cooper. He started out lecture like this:

MCATguy: So, just curious how many of you guys are taking the MCAT on January?
Everyone raises hand.
MCATguy: Alright. How many of you guys are in relationships?
Half the room raises hand.
MCATguy: Okay, lemme tell you a story that happened to me that’s going to happen to you.
Goes to board and draws circles.
MCATguy: Okay, here’s YOU. And here’s your boyfriend or girlfriend. Or even friends for that matter.
Draws another circle
MCATguy: Okay, and here is the MCAT.
Now, think of it this way…the MCAT, is a really good nucleophile.
Whole class laughs while he draws bond breaking arrows
MCATguy: True story.

ha ha haaaaaaaaa! 

We live in a world increasingly dominated by science. And that’s fine. I became a science writer because I think science is the most exciting, dynamic, consequential part of human culture, and I wanted to be a part of that. Also, I have two college-age kids, and I’d be thrilled if they pursued careers in science, engineering or medicine. I certainly want them to learn as much science and math as they can, because those skills can help you get a great job.

But it is precisely because science is so powerful that we need the humanities now more than ever. In your science, mathematics and engineering classes, you’re given facts, answers, knowledge, truth. Your professors say, “This is how things are.” They give you certainty. The humanities, at least the way I teach them, give you uncertainty, doubt and skepticism.

The humanities are subversive. They undermine the claims of all authorities, whether political, religious or scientific. This skepticism is especially important when it comes to claims about humanity, about what we are, where we came from, and even what we can be and should be. Science has replaced religion as our main source of answers to these questions. Science has told us a lot about ourselves, and we’re learning more every day.

But the humanities remind us that we have an enormous capacity for deluding ourselves. They also tell us that every single human is unique, different than every other human, and each of us keeps changing in unpredictable ways. The societies we live in also keep changing–in part because of science and technology! So in certain important ways, humans resist the kind of explanations that science gives us.

Science writer John Horgan responds to the major recent report on the value of the humanities. (via shrinkrants)

TRUTH.

(via aspiringdoctors)

(via aspiringdoctors)

ladykaymd:

thebiopsy:

"What is your hand on?" the surgeon asked, her question punctuated by the whirr of the ventilator wheezing away in the chilly operating room.
I stood there for a moment, quietly, just trying to get a sense of where my hand was in the first place. In reality, I knew just where my hand was. It wasn’t a trick question and it wasn’t particularly hard to answer. Part of me, though, just didn’t allow the realization to sink in. So, I stood there, searching for something more, something other than what my fingers obviously felt.
My mind stretched back to anatomy and embryology at the very beginning of the year for answers. Last August, everything, everyone, was new. My white coat was freshly white, uncreased, neatly kept, gleaming with my newly minted nametag - “Roheet Kakaday, Medical Student”. I had achieved the dream, but the promise had yet to be fulfilled. 
The first time I entered the anatomy lab, a chill ran down my body - the kind you get when you’re about to do something really significant. It was cold, like the operating room I was in now, and lives lived lay in front of us, waiting for us to learn. I learned and, soon, everything I saw became an anatomical problem. Short of breath? Probably a pulmonary abnormality. Patient has unilateral leg pain? Probably a pinched nerve between the piriformis and gemellus. Patient can’t move her arm? Brachial plexus neuropathy. As it turned out, some of that knowledge actually came in handy.
A few months later, all of that was complicated by biochemistry, by far one of my more challenging courses. Cycles, pathways, histologies, and reactions galore mucked up my once pristine anatomical differentials. Now, not only could it be a neuropathy, but, perhaps, an error in metabolism? Is she getting enough vitamins and amino acid precursors? What’s her diet like? The factors to consider multiplied ten fold. 
Then, along came physiology. Coming from an engineering background, where overviews take precedence over details, the homeostatic control systems of the body were a breath of fresh air relative to memorizing minutiae. Now, however, the differential became even more complex - could the neuropathy be because of a chemical imbalance? Hormonal dysfunction? The factors to consider grew again. 
Finally, immunology and infections hit with one last volume of information. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic etiologies ran amok in my differentials. Could it be an infection? Could it be cancer? Could it be an autoimmune disease? The factors, now, were astounding in number.
In the background, I started a company, won some awards, became an advisor for Stanford University’s Medicine X, was approached by entrepreneurs to collaborate on my electronic health record idea, joined a research team, started co-hosting a podcast on medical innovation, and more. The funny thing is, there is yet more in the pipeline.
Looking back on the year, it was incredible to think I did these things and finished medical school in one piece. None of it would be possible without the incredible support of friends, family, and folks on the Internet, like you, who would reach out to me.
At the end of the first year of medical school, the facts I have learned (and, let’s be honest, forgotten) is staggering. Indeed, the responsibility of managing that burden of knowledge is daunting. In the same vein, it’s still what keeps medical school exciting; the intellectual challenge is what motivates many of us medical students and the satisfaction of helping another is what helps keep us going.
If anything, I can say I have a basis now, a basic platform upon which to further build a clinical career, an idea with which to piece together the puzzle of human disease. That is incredible in and of itself.
"Mmmm?" the surgeon prompted me again. 
Snapped out of my brief lapse, I found myself back in the operating room. I looked into the open chest my hand had disappeared into. My fingers felt it - thump, thump, thump - and there was no need to even think.
It was, to some degree, instinctual now. 
"It’s the left ventricle…" I let that hover for a moment, "My hand is on the heart." It’s slick surface thumped and slid across my fingers, frozen in awe.
My wide-eyed amazement slowly sunk into the corners of the OR and the surgeon resumed working. As phenomenal as that was, I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 
And that is incredibly exciting.

"I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 
And that is incredibly exciting.”
I love that. 
Excellent piece by the lovely Roheet.
Medicine still remains the most incredible, wonderful thing in the world to me. :) We’re so incredibly lucky to get to do what we do every day. 

ladykaymd:

thebiopsy:

"What is your hand on?" the surgeon asked, her question punctuated by the whirr of the ventilator wheezing away in the chilly operating room.

I stood there for a moment, quietly, just trying to get a sense of where my hand was in the first place. In reality, I knew just where my hand was. It wasn’t a trick question and it wasn’t particularly hard to answer. Part of me, though, just didn’t allow the realization to sink in. So, I stood there, searching for something more, something other than what my fingers obviously felt.

My mind stretched back to anatomy and embryology at the very beginning of the year for answers. Last August, everything, everyone, was new. My white coat was freshly white, uncreased, neatly kept, gleaming with my newly minted nametag - “Roheet Kakaday, Medical Student”. I had achieved the dream, but the promise had yet to be fulfilled

The first time I entered the anatomy lab, a chill ran down my body - the kind you get when you’re about to do something really significant. It was cold, like the operating room I was in now, and lives lived lay in front of us, waiting for us to learn. I learned and, soon, everything I saw became an anatomical problem. Short of breath? Probably a pulmonary abnormality. Patient has unilateral leg pain? Probably a pinched nerve between the piriformis and gemellus. Patient can’t move her arm? Brachial plexus neuropathy. As it turned out, some of that knowledge actually came in handy.

A few months later, all of that was complicated by biochemistry, by far one of my more challenging courses. Cycles, pathways, histologies, and reactions galore mucked up my once pristine anatomical differentials. Now, not only could it be a neuropathy, but, perhaps, an error in metabolism? Is she getting enough vitamins and amino acid precursors? What’s her diet like? The factors to consider multiplied ten fold. 

Then, along came physiology. Coming from an engineering background, where overviews take precedence over details, the homeostatic control systems of the body were a breath of fresh air relative to memorizing minutiae. Now, however, the differential became even more complex - could the neuropathy be because of a chemical imbalance? Hormonal dysfunction? The factors to consider grew again. 

Finally, immunology and infections hit with one last volume of information. Bacterial, fungal, viral, and parasitic etiologies ran amok in my differentials. Could it be an infection? Could it be cancer? Could it be an autoimmune disease? The factors, now, were astounding in number.

In the background, I started a companywon some awardsbecame an advisor for Stanford University’s Medicine X, was approached by entrepreneurs to collaborate on my electronic health record ideajoined a research team, started co-hosting a podcast on medical innovation, and more. The funny thing is, there is yet more in the pipeline.

Looking back on the year, it was incredible to think I did these things and finished medical school in one piece. None of it would be possible without the incredible support of friends, family, and folks on the Internet, like you, who would reach out to me.

At the end of the first year of medical school, the facts I have learned (and, let’s be honest, forgotten) is staggering. Indeed, the responsibility of managing that burden of knowledge is daunting. In the same vein, it’s still what keeps medical school exciting; the intellectual challenge is what motivates many of us medical students and the satisfaction of helping another is what helps keep us going.

If anything, I can say I have a basis now, a basic platform upon which to further build a clinical career, an idea with which to piece together the puzzle of human disease. That is incredible in and of itself.

"Mmmm?" the surgeon prompted me again. 

Snapped out of my brief lapse, I found myself back in the operating room. I looked into the open chest my hand had disappeared into. My fingers felt it - thump, thump, thump - and there was no need to even think.

It was, to some degree, instinctual now. 

"It’s the left ventricle…" I let that hover for a moment, "My hand is on the heart." It’s slick surface thumped and slid across my fingers, frozen in awe.

My wide-eyed amazement slowly sunk into the corners of the OR and the surgeon resumed working. As phenomenal as that was, I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 

And that is incredibly exciting.

"I realized that this will be my new normal. This will be my everyday. 

And that is incredibly exciting.”

I love that. 

Excellent piece by the lovely Roheet.

Medicine still remains the most incredible, wonderful thing in the world to me. :) We’re so incredibly lucky to get to do what we do every day. 

I can do it. I know I can do it and I will. I will prove everyone wrong.

Anonymous asked: Can I ask for a prayer request? I just found out that the financial aid I thought I was getting for school sort of fell through, and I'm heartbroken and unsure of how I'll pay. I'd like to extend this request to everyone fighting to get themselves an education, please. Thank you, and have a wonderful day!

alwaysabeautifullife:

*Prayer Request*

Absolutely I will pray for you! Please reblog and pray!